March 2018

“I am praying not only for these disciples but also for all who will ever believe in me through their message. I pray that they will all be one, just as you and I are one—as you are in me, Father, and I am in you. And may they be in us so that the world will believe you sent me.” John 17:20-21

As a part of the one body of Christ and working toward the Kingdom of God, Catholic health care must continually reach outside itself to participate in the life of the Church. An essential element of being the hands and feet of Jesus on Earth today, Catholic health care commits itself to acting in communion with the institutional Church.

Traditionally we have done this through offering sacraments and prayer and displaying the signs and symbols of our faith. For much of our history women and men religious were the concrete operational and spiritual link to the wider Church. In more recent years we have added the formation of leaders and co-workers to understand, appreciate and uphold our unique identities and core values. Even so, these practices are each internal to our facilities. No part of the Church exists for itself, but has to expand beyond its walls.

The Latin root of our word communion, communio, indicates fellowship, sharing and mutual participation. True communion does not happen without active participation in answering the call of the Gospel. Therefore, to act in communion with the Church, indeed to act as Church, is to collaborate with the parishes and diocese in which we serve. It means we prioritize partnerships with other Catholic ministries in our local context.

Jesus’ life was a dynamic combination of teaching and preaching, service and healing. To the extent we participate with our brothers and sisters who teach and preach in the name of Jesus and those who serve in his name in all manner of ways, we are better able to manifest the fullness of Christ’s body on earth and bear witness together to the Kingdom of God that both is and is to come.

 

For Reflection

“You are the Body of Christ. In you and through you the work of the incarnation must go forward. You are to be taken. You are to be blessed, broken and distributed, that you may be the means of grace and vehicles of eternal love.” Saint Augustine

  • Do I / we honor and operationalize the identity of our ministry as a “Catholic work”?
  • Do I / we reach out to the other Catholic ministries for local, regional and national partnerships?
  • Do I / we uphold the commitment of Catholic moral and ethical teachings?
  • Do I / we build or tear down community among our family and team and neighborhood?
  • Do I / we actively participate and bring the fullness of ourselves to those around us?

Prayer

God of all times and places, in each generation you gather a people unto yourself called to serve, teach and heal in your name. Send your spirit over your Church across the world that we may labor together to do your will, reveal your love and share your goodness. In this season of reflection and prayer, give us the graces we need to more fully follow you and become who we claim to be in your name. Amen.

(c) Catholic Health Association of the United States of America. Reposted with permission.

Murphy’s Irish Dance Performance

Saturday, March 24, 2018

in News

The amazing dancers from Murphy Irish Arts Center treated us to a performance. We loved the impressive display of tradition and footwork. 

 
About Irish Dancing:
Irish dance or Irish dancing is a group of traditional dance forms originating from Ireland, encompassing dancing both solo and in groups, and dancing for social, competitive, and performance purposes. Irish dance in its current form developed from various influences such as French quadrilles and English country dancing throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. Dance was taught by “travelling dance masters” across Ireland throughout this period, and separate dance forms developed according to regional practice and differing purposes. Irish dance became a significant part of Irish culture, particularly for Irish nationalist movements. From the early 20th century, a number of organizations promoted and codified the various forms of dance, creating competitive structures and standardized styles.

Solo Irish dance includes the most well-known form of Irish dance, Irish step dance, which was popularized from 1994 onwards by dance shows such as Riverdance, and which is practiced competitively across the Irish diaspora. Step dance is characterized by the rigid upper body and intricate footwork of its performers. Other forms of solo Irish dance include sean-nós dance, a relaxed and social dance style involving improvised steps, and festival Irish dance, a style which separated from step dance in the mid-20th century.

Irish dancing in groups is made up of a number of styles and traditions, which developed from French and English dances and formations. Ceili dance, practiced both competitively and socially, is performed by groups of two to sixteen people, and often uses traditional or codified dances and formations. Its footwork is simple, and emphasis is placed on the figures and formations of the dances. Set dance is primarily a social tradition, for groups of four dancers, and includes elements of the intricate footwork found in step dance.

This performance was made possible thanks to Cuyahoga County residents through Cuyahoga Arts and Culture.

“Well done, good and faithful servant.” Reflection for the Fifth Week of Lent

Sunday, March 18, 2018

“Well done, good and faithful servant. You have been faithful and trustworthy over a little, I will put you in charge of many things; share in the joy of your master.” Matthew 25:21
God gifts each one of us with a unique combination of time, talent and treasure to use while we are on Earth for the good [more…]

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Jennings celebrates Founder’s Day

Saturday, March 17, 2018

We’re proud to celebrate March 17 as our 76th anniversary of residences and services for older adults! Our namesake is a memorial to Monsignor Gilbert P. Jennings. Monsignor Jennings was the founding pastor of St. Agnes Parish, then located on Superior Avenue near the old Cleveland Playhouse. Considered to be a socially progressive thinker, Monsignor Jennings was [more…]

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Reflection for the fourth week of Lent: do justice, love kindness and walk humbly

Sunday, March 11, 2018

“He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?” Micah 6:8
The commitment to justice is essential in Catholic tradition. From the witness of the prophets who call us to “do justice, love kindness and [more…]

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Spring ahead! Move your clock ahead and check your smoke alarm

Sunday, March 11, 2018

You moved your clocks ahead this morning, right? The Ohio Fire Marshal reminds us about the crucial step of checking batteries in smoke and CO detectors too.
“Ohioans shouldn’t just move their clocks forward one hour this Sunday, they should also check to see if a potentially lifesaving device has expired – their smoke alarm. Along with [more…]

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Jennings celebrates Founder’s Day with annual Mass and brunch

Sunday, March 4, 2018

Each March, the Jennings community celebrates Founder’s Day. We honor Monsignor Gilbert Patrick Jennings, whose forward thinking, compassionate heart and planned philanthropic gift gave our organization its start in 1942. On Sunday, March 4 we gathered with staff, board members, friends, donors and Sisters of the Holy Spirit to commemorate our ministry’s 76th year. We [more…]

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Reflection for the third week of Lent: the human person is sacred

Sunday, March 4, 2018

“For even as the body is one and yet has many members, and all the members of the body, though they are many, are one body, so also is Christ.”
1 Corinthians 12:12
Created in the image and likeness of God, the human person is not only sacred, but also social. Just as God is a radical [more…]

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